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Posts for tag: gum disease

By WESTLAKE PERIODONTICS, SCOTT D. SAZIMA, DDS
May 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health

What your periodontist in Westlake, Ohio wants you to know about periodontal services.Periodontal disease

Did you know that a periodontist can make your smile look better? It’s true, because in addition to keeping your gums, supporting bone, and teeth healthy, your periodontist can also perform services to improve the cosmetic beauty of your smile. Dr. Scott Sazima at Westlake Periodontics in Westlake, Ohio wants to share how he can help you.

Periodontists perform many services to manage periodontal disease including:

  • Periodontal therapy to keep bacteria levels low, improve and maintain the health of your mouth
  • Periodontal and oral surgery to remove unhealthy, diseased tissue in order to create healthy attachment and support for your teeth

What many people don’t realize is that there are also many periodontal services that can improve the look of your smile. A very common problem is bulky, excessive, or uneven gums, what’s called a “gummy smile.” Your periodontist is an expert at remaking your smile by creating a better ratio of gums to teeth. You want people to notice your gorgeous teeth, and not your large, puffy gums.

That’s why your periodontist offers:

  • Gum resculpting; this treatment uses a laser to remove excess gum tissue and sculpt more harmonious gum contours.
  • Gum recontouring; this treatment surgically removes excess gum tissue, reshapes your gums and provides a higher gumline to show more of your teeth.
  • Receding gums are another common issue that can be treated by your periodontist. As your gums recede, your tooth roots become exposed, making teeth sensitive and prone to decay.

Your periodontist treats receding gums with:

Gum grafting; this treatment uses a patch of soft tissue (graft) which is applied to the area of recession. The graft is secured and grows in to replace the lost tissue.

It’s time to think differently about periodontics! Your periodontist can improve the health of your mouth, and the appearance of your smile. If your smile needs a little help, just call Dr. Scott Sazima at Westlake Periodontics in Westlake, Ohio. Find out more by calling today!

By contactus@westlakeperio.com
July 19, 2016
Category: Uncategorized

Everybody prioritizes their oral hygiene, yet many of our patients throughout Northeast, OH are generally not familiar with what exists under the gum line. Even though teeth appear small, they are considerably bigger than people imagine. In cases where gum disease starts, regular cleanings are not enough to completely bring back your teeth and gums back to a healthy state. Once your gum tissues develop inflammation from periodontal disease, deep cleanings become vital.

Deep Cleanings Periodontitis Northeast Ohio

Our practice are frequently asked, "What does a deep cleaning involve?" A deep teeth cleaning is also known as scaling and root planing. Scaling scrapes away tartar and bacterial build up that could be attached beneath the gum line on the roots and within the pockets of gum tissue surrounding the roots. Root planing smoothes the roots of bumpy areas in which microbes and bacteria thrive if not dealt with. This particular process helps your gum tissues to regenerate and make it possible for your gum pockets to decrease. Antimicrobial drugs may also be delivered below the gum line in order to further assist the healing process. The deep cleaning program in most cases involves 2-4 appointments, and requires a local anesthetic ("numbing") for treatment.

Periodontal disease is not curable and is a systemic disease, much like diabetes or hypertension. This makes deep cleanings extremely important if one want to preserve good oral health. Gum disease is oftentimes a "silent disease" as well, since a large number of patients do not have any noticeable pain or symptoms. Gum disease attacks the structure of the tooth and diminishes the bone, roots and gum structure. In the event that the tartar and bacteria are amassing under the gum line, it can cause tooth mobility and loss. If not properly handled, mouth bacteria can have an effect on your whole entire body, not just the gums and teeth. After the initial disease process is managed by using the deep cleanings, it is necessary to get regular follow-up cleanings to stop future irritation and bone loss around the teeth. The purpose of deep cleanings is to stop the active disease, preserve the oral health, and maintain enhanced oral and general health.

To learn more on root planing and scaling, check out Oral-B's website. To learn more on how you can prevent periodontal disease, contact our office or follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Google+.

By contactus@westlakeperio.com
June 08, 2016
Category: Oral Health

An additional concern is periodontitis which is a persistent problem which impairs your gums as well as your bones. This particular infection damages the bone and connective tissue in charge of keeping the teeth in place. Due to osteoporosis, there can be an enhanced threat to contract 

periodontitis because of the minimized bone density and being more susceptible to bacteria. Nevertheless, we are still unsure if periodontitis has a direct relationship with osteoporosis.

At Westlake Periodontics, Dr. Scott Sazima, DDS and our team believe that enhancing your general bone health will, in turn, improve your oral health. Dr. Sazima and team will recommend a versatile treatment strategy in order to increase bone health, which may incorporate our Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP). Additionally, a healthy diet program that is rich in calcium and vitamin D, routine exercise, avoiding smoking and restricting your alcohol intake will improve your oral health. Andof course regular routine oral care is crucial in minimizing your chances of getting periodontitis.

If you would like to learn more on this topic or improve your oral health please feel free to schedule an appointment.  Additionally, to learn more facts regarding this and other types of oral heath subjects, please like us on Facebook and follow us on Google+ and Twitter!

By contactus@westlakeperio.com
May 27, 2016
Category: Gum Disease

Not everyone knows that bone is active living tissue that can serves a number of purposes. It is not just the structural groundwork for to human bodies, but bones additionally are a foundation for muscles, protect vital organs, and also store most of the body's calcium. Bones are composed of flexible filaments (referred to as collagen) and crystals of calcium phosphate. These particular compounds constitute the solid yet pliant form.

During the course of our life, a natural procedure happens where bone is cleared away by osteoclast cells and fresh bone is materialized by virtue of osteoblast cells. The structure of our bone becomes weak as we grow older. Osteoporosis may impact any bone in the body—it's not favorably inclined to any single individual place. In the case that you've been diagnosed with osteoporosis you might be worried about exactly how the disease might impact your dental well being.

A connection between osteoporosis and bone loss in the jaw has actually been shown via research. Should your jaw bone lose too much solidity, tooth loss may occur since the jaw bone is the foundation and anchor for our teeth. Females diagnosed with osteoporosis have been shown to be 3 times more likely to experience tooth loss than those who don't have osteoporosis, as reported by the National Institute of Health. Various other dental care issues which may result because of inadequate bone density inside the jaw include: loose-fitting dentures, receding gums, and even poor surgical outcomes.

Check back for our next article concerning Oral Health & Osteoporosis. To find out even more information on this and many other oral heath matters, please like us on Facebook and follow us on Google+ and Twitter!

The following is a limited summary for those who are confused about gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Inside a healthy mouth, your teeth are kept in place by gums, bone as well as ligaments. When plaque—a sticky layer comprised of bacteria—builds up about the teeth, it can inflame the gums, triggering them to pull away from the teeth and create pockets. These pockets enable the collection of even more harmful bacteria, and infection. This is what is called gingivitis.

Your hygienist or dentist can detect this by means of evaluating the extent of the pockets around each and every tooth. In a healthy mouth, periodontal pockets typically don't go beyond 1-3mm in deepness, while infected gum pockets are usually bigger, and tend to bleed.

Left untreated, gingivitis will inevitably turn into advanced periodontitis. The tartar and plaque building up on the gum line starts to break down the soft tissues which reinforce the teeth, and, as the condition progresses, the bone that reinforces the teeth will likely be effected also. This can result in loose teeth that may need to be extracted.

Periodontitis is treatable, fortunately, and in the early stages, can be dealt with by means of professional cleanings as well as improved home care. For those individuals with advanced gum disease, periodontists including Dr. Sazima at our Westlake, OH practice may suggest root planing and scaling. This is a deep cleaning where the root of the tooth is cleared of tartar and plaque all the way down to the lowest part the gum pocket, encouraging the gums to reattach to the tooth.

If you could be experiencing gum disease, call us at Scott Sazima, DDS to set up a consultation: (440) 835-4600